NYC transport on a spreadsheet

Many who know me – especially those who know me professionally – know that I love a spreadsheet. It’s perhaps unsurprising that an engineer who loves maths is tickled by all those figures and calculations and charts. But I really do love ’em. I put everything work-related into spreadsheets. The orderliness appeals to me, and because it’s easy to manipulate and chart the data (even if that’s only a possibility later). I’m one of those guys people in the office go to when they have a spreadsheet question.

I put my personal life into spreadsheets, too: lists of the CDs I own (when I bought them) and flags and calculations for how many of the artists I’d seen live. Inventories for insurance purposes. Task lists for moving. Christmas gift lists. I wrote a program to calculate beam deflections in grad school with spreadsheet macros.

I love spreadsheets.

Yesterday I read a Wired article about Charles Komanoff, a traffic expert, who has modelled “the economic and environmental impact of every single car, bus, truck, taxi, train, subway, bicycle, and pedestrian moving around New York City” in an effort to create the optimum set of tolls and flows. And he’s done it all in an Excel spreadsheet. If you read that article there’s even a link where you can download the spreadsheet itself.

That’s so hot. I’m serious, it’s so amazing.

It’s got 50 tabs. Everything’s well-documented (a key element if you want to share your spreadsheet with others). It may be a bit pie-in-the-sky to expect Americans to accept Komanoff’s vision, which would implement several public road tolls around the city. But I am in awe of his dedication, organisation, and capacity to numerically model what is an inherently chaotic system.